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COPING WITH DIVORCE

Coping with divorce can be very difficult, and according to studies, the effects the dissolution of a marriage can have on children involved are extensive. Statistics showing that every one in two marriages in the U.S. will end in divorce makes it extremely important to focus on coping with divorce strategies. Children from single parent homes are shown to more often live in poverty, suffer from behavioral problems and do not do as well in school, according to studies. Working on improving America's marriages, as a result, can help improve social environments and financial consequences that arise when divorces ensue.

Since 2002, the federal government has set aside $47 million to study and promote marriage in state initiatives, with lawmakers hoping reductions in the divorce rate will mean less families being forced into coping with divorce. Deciding to separate is not always a mutual choice, making it is especially difficult for coping with divorce for one spouse in particular. The range of emotions experienced, as well as the financial implications coping with divorce can have can translate into lasting effects. It is important for families to realize that it can take time coping with divorce, but that there are ways to transition easier, especially for children.

Still, there are no sure ways of coping with divorce since all couples and families experience separation differently. Failing to acknowledge and deal with feelings regardless of how hard coping with divorce can be can have long-term consequences. Coping with divorce when children are involved by taking care of you first can help communicate to the children that they are not alone with whatever they are dealing with.

Everyone has different ways of coping with divorce, and even though some individuals do not want to spend time with other people initially, strong support networks of family and friends can really help ease the individual back into a routine and realize they are not alone. Though it is impossible to understand exactly how another person is coping with divorce, broken marriage in the U.S. is so prevalent today that there are resources and things available to make the process as manageable as possible.

A broken marriage is between incompatible parents, and children should not be forced into the middle, and especially should not be forced to choose sides. Children coping with divorce should be able to maintain a relationship with both parents and be involved in the process without shouldering the responsibility of the failed marriage. It can take awhile to find a plan that works for the family, but in the meantime children coping with divorce must be able to feel like they have access to open lines of communication.

Divorces can get ugly, but both spouses and children have rights that involve custody, division of assets and other financial obligations. Reputable divorce lawyers understand the emotional suffering accompanying a separation but will also understand that coping with divorce cannot move forward until the legal process has ended. Educated and experienced in finalizing divorce terms, experienced divorce lawyers can help people coping with divorce reach terms that are fair and just.

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Issues Regarding Child Custody


Child Custody Rights

Child custody rights may be shared by both parents or, primary child custody rights may be awarded to one parent or legal guardian. Since the 1970s the family court will award child custody rights contingent with the best interests of the child.

Custody for Fathers

Child custody for fathers following a divorce is one of the most important aspects of a dissolving marriage. Throughout history the legal presumptions about child custody for fathers has changed significantly. Before the twentieth century children were regarded as the property of their father. Under common law, child custody for fathers was commonly awarded, as children were considered a father's rightful property. A major shift occurred after this period in history, as family courts came to favor mothers in child custody cases. It was presumed that under normal circumstances, children did better when placed in the sole custody of their mothers.

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